The 21st Century Classroom – Technique 1 Blogging

The 21st Century classroom is more than simply addressing what education is today.  It is attempting to make education what it should be in 2015, rather than continuing the learning practices that we know from the 20th Century.  It is literally pointing out, “Hey, it’s not 1998 anymore!”  As educators, we owe our students the opportunity to learn in the true 21st Century.

The Connected Classroom’s article (http://theconnectedclassroom.wikispaces.com/Classroom) also points out that 21st Century learning is “much more than just having good technology skills. It is learning core subjects with application of these learning skills and communication tools.”  This type of learning is student-centered, which is what we have always wanted as teachers, but have always struggled with truly implementing.  A great tool for creating this student-based, collaborative learning is blogging.  The reason blogs have been so popular over the years has been their relative ease in giving anyone a platform to speak their ideas and allow others to join the conversation.  This opportunity is just as relevant in the classroom where we want all of our students to speak their mind and have deep conversations.  With a blog, teachers can put the conversation completely in the students’ hands and allow all of the wait-time needed for students to construct and deliver their opinion.  As teachers, we can simply watch and “listen” to the direction the students take the conversation about the content that they forgot we asked them to learn.

A few other articles about 21st Century classrooms —

21st Century Classroom: http://theconnectedclassroom.wikispaces.com/Classroom

Technology, Instruction, and the 21st Century Classroom: http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2013/05/technology-instruction-and-21st-century-classroom

Top 10 Characteristics of a 21st Century Classroom: http://edtechreview.in/news/862-top-10-characteristics-of-a-21st-century-classroom

The Four C’s: Making 21st Century Learning Happen:

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